Horses And High Heels 2012

Discography

Horses And High Heels 2012

Released: 2012
Recorded: Piety Street Recording, New Orleans
Producers: Produced by Hal Willner
Mixing: Mark Bingham
Label: Naive

Horses And High Heels

Marianne Faithfull


break Click on the song titles above for lyrics and songwriting credits

Why Do We Have To Part? was issued as a single prior to the albums release
Why Do We Have To Part? was issued as a single prior to the albums release
Recorded in New Orleans with a core of exceptional local musicians, Horses and High Heels features eight cover versions and four original new songs co-written by Marianne, four songs which feature the virtuoso guitar playing of John Porter, a musician/producer friend most noted for his work with Roxy Music, Eric Clapton and The Smiths. The album also includes one song with lyrics specially written for her by Irish playwright Frank McGuiness (the evocative ‘The Old House’), two cameo appearances on guitar from another old friend, Lou Reed, plus further cameos from Dr. John and MC5’s Wayne Kramer. It’s all exquisitely produced by long-term collaborator Hal Willner, the soundscape alchemist behind the critically-lauded Easy Come, Easy Go (2009), “I never stop working these days,” avers Marianne in her sumptuous, throaty timbre. “Because I can do it. I’m healthy. And I love working, I think it’s good for me. I’m very happy and I’m having a very good time. I think the worst is over. And it’s about time, really, isn’t it?”

Horses And High Heels was recorded in the New Orleans French Quarter over September/October 2010 and features a spectrum of astonishing musicianship from the city’s musical pool. “We wanted to have fun, find great musicians and of course New Orleans is cheaper than New York,” laughs the always refreshingly honest Marianne. It spans the spectrum of soul, blues, folk, country, jazz-pop perkiness and beguiling guitar-rock, all underpinned by her striking vocals and hauntingly influenced by the perhaps unlikely musical combination of jazz, classical music and Nick Cave’s malevolent Grinderman. The cover versions see Marianne and Hal once again reprise their uncanny gift for finding beautiful, unexpected and often scandalously overlooked songs, as dramatic as they’re coolly diverse. “We just do find great songs,” notes Marianne, “but there’s no theme...well, the only theme is me.”

There’s the brooding, spectral guitar-rock of Greg Dulli & Mark Lanegan’s ‘The Stations’, the swooning, country-rock tinge of R.B Morris’ ‘That’s How Every Empire Falls’ and the bar-room blues and 70s soul revue thrills of Jackie Lomax’s ‘No Reason’. “We chose some soul material this time which I was very unsure of at first,” muses Marianne. “‘No Reason’, ‘Back In Baby’s Arms’, ‘Gee Baby’, these songs are more vocally demanding and it was quite frightening. But I think we managed it.” Elsewhere are glimmering 70s soul classics, from the gorgeous, steel-guitar-layered ‘Love Song’ (originally written by 70s song-writer Lesley Duncan and made famous by Elton John), the bewitching piano reverie of Carol King’s ‘Goin’ Back’ (definitively recorded in ‘66 by Dusty Springfield) and her positively Shakespearian rendition of the Shangri-Las masterpiece, ‘Past Present and Future’.

Marianne on the French TV show 'One Shot Not' photo Benjamin Decoin
Marianne on the French TV show 'One Shot Not' photo Benjamin Decoin
Her four original new songs, meanwhile, are a revelation: the folky and unfeasibly rousing ‘Why Did We Have To Part?’, an elegy to the end of a long relationship “I just couldn’t resist a break-up song - and the pain is over”, to the rollicking, Hammond swirl of ‘Prussian Blue’ (a paean to her life in Paris), the rhythmically compelling, Celtic-folk-tinged ‘Horses And High Heels’ (“just me watching from my windows in Paris and Ireland”) and the joyous ‘Eternity’ featuring a sampled Arabian-jazz flourish from Brian Jones’ recording in Morocco with the Master Musicians of Jajouka (1968’s ‘Brian Jones Presents: The Pipes of Pan at Jajouka’). “It’s all a very different style for me,” notes Marianne, “much more rhythmic. And a very modern record, it’s not looking back to the past at all. All the songs are about now, you know?”

No wonder, at the heart of Horses And High Heels, is the sound of a worldly, sophisticated joy - an album as colourful, dramatic and artistically liberated as her own extraordinary life.

“Conventional happiness isn’t my way, you know,” notes the irresistibly unconventional Marianne. “But this is a very happy record. I’m not depressed anymore. And I think it’s all been well worth it. I did have a bit of a bad time in the 70s but I think things have been wonderful. So I suppose this album is a bit of a breakthrough. I’m incredibly lucky, don’t think I don’t know it. I’m so grateful to be able to still write songs and express my emotion in music. And the best thing of all is working with such great people. It’s inspirational.”